Irish Sailing and Mountaineering Adventure Challenge

Frequently asked questions - FAQs

 

When is it going to happen?
The race will start at 6pm on Saturday 16 June 2018, in Kinsale, County Cork, Ireland.

Is the Irish Sailing and Mountaineering Adventure Challenge (ISAMAC) the same as the Irish Three Peaks Yacht Race?
Yes - The Irish Three Peaks Yacht Race was an earlier name for the event, but was changed to avoid any confusion with the Three Peaks Yacht Race (Barmouth to Fort Filliam).

What is the symbolism behind the ISAMAC logo?
The logo echos the other Trionium race logos with stylised mountains.The greenness represents the lovely greenery of Ireland (and the green of the Irish flag), fed by all that fabulous rain. The tops of the three peaks are covered in snow - showing that they are not to be taken lightly. The smallest of the three hills in the logo is Hungry Hill, although in reality this is not the least of the hills in the race - the traverse of the Hungry Hill Horseshoe is a serious prospect. The second highest is Mount Brandon, and the highest is Carrauntoohil - Ireland's highest mountain. The three yachts signify different competitors in the race: The largest one is winning: the second largest yacht is lost and is going in the wrong direction. The smallest of the three yachts has given up and is going home.

I'm a novice sailor and a slow runner - is this the event for me?
This is going to be a proper challenge… it’s probably not one for novice sailors or for slow runners (a four-hour marathon time would be agood benchmark, as well as a strong navigation background and hill-walking experience). The sailing is going to be very challenging (North Atlantic swells are a challenge on a good day!) and the hills are not to be messed with. On a scale of hard-core-osity, this is probably up there with the tougher challenges in the British Isles, such as the SIPR, 3PYR and the OMM.

Have you had much interest in it so far?
Yes, we’ve been approached by skippers, crew members, associations, charterers and others - there has been a lot of interest. We expect to have at least half a dozen entries in the first race and maybe quite a few more. Remember - 'Mighty oaks from little acorns grow.'

Do you expect that people will be running non stop up each of the mountains or is it more likely to include some walking too?
Generally, runners will run to the hills, jog the slopes, walk the steep bits and run like hell back down again!

Do people go up the mountains during darkness or do they wait until daylight?
The event will take place very close to mid-summer, so the period of darkness is not likely to be very long. In any case, it’s a race, so teams are very likely to proceed at whatever time they arrive. All teams will be required to have head-torches in any case. Is is almost certain that some of the hills will require night-navigation.

What size boat would you expect people to be sailing?
We expect that the majority of boats will be from around 26 to 38 feet length.

Is the handicap of the boat taken into account?
We are working on this.

What's the weather going to be like?
That's the US$64,000 question! On 16 June 2017, one year from the race itself, the sea was calm and the winds were light (almost too light: 5knts). However, it could be blowing a gale on 16 June 2018 - the likelihood is that you will experience a variety of weather, some good, some not-so-good. Be prepared!

How long do you expect it to take?
According to our calculations, if boats travel at an average speed of 5 knots, we expect the fastest teams to finish within 50 hours (the last finishers are expected to take up to 70-80 hours). Download the ISAMAC-spreadsheet.xls.

Who’s organising this?
Robert McCaffrey, who says, “I’m an event organiser, runner and sailor of nearly 30 year's experience and have skippered yachts in the Scottish Islands Peaks Race and the Three Peaks Yacht Race. I decided that I would like to try the Irish equivalent, but found that there wasn’t one, so decided to try and come up with my own version. The course strongly suggests itself, and incorporates all the best bits of those two other famous races.”

What is Trionium?
Trionium is the 'brand' behind all of the organiser's award-winning races and is well-known as a signifier of quality and toughness. As the saying goes, 'Trionium: The hardest stuff known to man.'

How much is it to enter?
Per team, the early-bird cost will be GBP£300, rising to the standard rate of GBP£400 on 1 January 2018 and then to a final 'late rate' of GBP£500 per crew of five on 1 May 2018. This is comparable to other races of this size, length and complexity, and is designed to cover the race costs only.

Where's the money going?
The race is expected to just cover its costs (and will be backed by sponsors) - but if there is any surplus, it will be given as a charitable donation to Kerry Mountain Rescue and to the Irish RNLI. After all, we may need them!

Do you need any volunteers to help with the race?
We'd love to have some help 'on the ground.'Volunteers will be welcome - contact the organiser at rob@trionium [dot] com.

Can I get involved in the organisation of the race?
We have already made quite a few contacts on the ground and have had a lot of enthusiastic support. We are very keen to involve as many local organisations as possible, so that the event has got ‘legs’ and so that it will happen again in future years.

Email: rob@trionium.com